PQ Insider considers what the Smith Commission might say about Scottish broadcasting

Here in BBC Scotland very close attention will be paid to Lord Smith’s report this week.

The rest of the world may be rightly concerned about the high politics, and the detail of fiscal and welfare devolution. Our news department and its hangers-on will be telling the story in their usual way. The audience will have no problem discerning the Labour line, plus whatever the SNP government spinners have told Brian Taylor.

By Derek Bateman


Have we become Irish? I ask because there is such a hilariously contradictory mood around that it could be St Patrick’s Day. ‘Happy? Of course we’re happy. We lost our independence and our living standards are going backwards but isn’t the party grand?’


Makes you wonder just what we would be doing if we’d won the referendum… ‘Cabinet members arrived for their first meeting dressed in assorted onesies. First Minister Sturgeon came in a panda outfit accompanied by the Shotts and Dykehead Caledonia Pipe Band…The Cabinet sang Do They Know It’s Christmas before going into Bute House where they debagged Brian Taylor and threw his trousers on to the street. Reflecting off the windows were the flames of bonfires set by the mob in Charlotte Square gardens…’

By Robert Given

I joined the SNP 24 years ago. I have carried the card ever since.

I liked them when it seemed very few people did. I canvassed with Nicola and remember Alex and Kenny from the poll tax campaign days.  In rock and roll terms I bought the first single, watched them play the student union. Now that they have double platinum-selling albums, play stadiums with an international fan base and have changed lead singer a couple of times, is it still possible to love the SNP?

To The Hydro!

Commentary by Thomas Connolly

Welcome to the start of the SNP’s UK general election campaign. With a new leader in place and a massive surge in membership, the party spent the weekend getting on a war footing for the May 7 poll.

Nicola Sturgeon’s long expected elevation came in the most unexpected of circumstances. The resignation of a party leader after a referendum defeat usually signals a fearful entry into the doldrums.

By Hugh Kerr


Creative Scotland the troubled body responsible for distributing around £100 million of our money to fund the arts has managed to create a stushie over its first funding budget since it was relaunched.

In particular it has caused major comment by cutting the budget entirely of Scottish Youth Theatre, which was responsible for the beginnings of many great theatrical careers in Scotland.

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